Imaginarium- Closing

Imaginarium- ClosingDate: Friday, May 5th, 2017
Time: 7:00 PM - 10:00 PM
Gallery Hours: Saturdays, 2 - 5pm, or by appointment.

Imaginarium is a group show assembled by local musician and longtime Pittsburgh Filmmakers employee Mike Bonello. All of the artists joining him in this exhibition are former co-workers, over ten photographers and filmmakers. 

Come on out and help us close out this Imaginarium show on Cinco de Mayo with a
Throwdown dance party & projections by Tricky Powers and Mulekicked Visions & Live music by Gangwish!

www.theziemba.com

Photography by Sue Abramson, Aaron Blum, Andrew Jason Coleman, Julie Gonzalez, Athena Frances Harden and Dan Wetmore.

Film & video by Mike Bonello, Brady Lewis, Christopher Smalley, Ross Nugent, Meagan Koleck, Matthew R. Day and Andrew Jason Coleman.

Mike Bonello

Still from Something in the water supply

 Mike Bonello

Mike Bonello is a musician and experimental filmmaker living in Pittsburgh. He has been playing original music in Pittsburgh bands since 1991, and founded Rickety Records in 1994. His exhibitions are typically either multi-projector film loop performances accompanying live music,  installations, or immersive/interactive dance-party environments. He has been working on an on-going series of experiments involving triple-exposing color film while pointing the camera at various states of water, or dancers, or piles of glitter. He’s playing bass guitar in Terry & the Cops and Mantle Plumes, and acoustic music around the house.

Sue Abramson

Dream Trees

Sue Abramson

Sue Abramson is a fine art photographer working in Pittsburgh. Most of her imagery uses alternative photographic methods—photograms, cyanotype, pinhole, and scanning—in connection with the environmental landscape. Abramson’s photography focuses on the organic and fragmented composition of nature while simultaneously exploring the process of grief and grieving. She is an Adjunct Associate professor of photography at Pittsburgh Filmmakers, where she has taught photographic methods for 30 years.

Aaron Blum

Bluebell 

bluebell1 001

 

Aaron Blum is an eighth generation West Virginian, and creates art deeply linked to his home. Most of his work centers around a single question, what does it mean to be Appalachian? Through this question he address many different artistic concepts, from idealized memory vs. stereotypes to ideas of folk taxonomy. His creation process is a diversified approach of image-based media to create a glimpse into his own concepts of Appalachia, and the social fabric of a very large and misrepresented people and place. He pays close attention to the quality of light and the landscape as well as cultural markers to produce a unique version of life in the hills. After graduating with degrees in photography from West Virginia University and Syracuse University, Aaron immediately began receiving recognition for his work including Center of Santa Fe, Silvereye Center for photography, Critical Mass, and FOAM.

Andrew Jason Coleman

Fife & Jones

Andrew Jason Coleman

 

Andrew Coleman is a photographer first and a camera repair technician second. Daily disassembly of cameras and a fascination with the optics of photography has created opportunities to modify both the lens and camera to better suit the needs of his subject. The results also serve to reflect his own fractured perceptions and a yearning for an unexpected visual authenticity. Exploiting the imperfections and peculiarities of both antique and custom lens design, his work has been described as “dreamlike”, “memorial”, and “blurry”. He lives and works in Pittsburgh, hoping one day to make a satisfactory image.

Julie Gonzalez

Julie Gonzalez

 

Julie Gonzalez was born in Cordoba, Argentina and raised in Baltimore, Md. She spent more than a decade on the move before putting down roots in Pittsburgh about 12 years ago. The mother of 2 young girls, photography is a luxury at this point in her life; Not something to immerse herself in, but something to daydream about. When given the chance she shoots black and white film, prints in a darkroom, and has a penchant for pinhole. Her current projects involve anything she can complete in short bursts on a shoestring budget.

Athena Frances Harden

Anticipate

Athena Frances Harden

 

Athena Frances Harden was born July 1989 in the countryside of SW Pennsylvania. She earned a BFA from Point Park University in 2013. Using an array of mediums including photography, video and collage to create a deeply personal presentation of how she feels the world around her. Evoking strong emotions with her earthy, delicate, and intimate style she is able to bring awareness to simple detail with a sense of passionate energy.  Harden currently resides in the city where she mixes ink, studies bodywork and is continually learning how to balance the heart/mind.

Dan Wetmore

Buffalo Man

Dan Wetmore

 

Dan Wetmore is a Pittsburgh based artist/photographer. His work deals primarily with post industrial landscape via a false-documentary, aesthetics oriented approach that encourages nostalgia and romanticism. Dan received his BFA  from Syracuse University in 2013, was a 2014 Light Work grant winner and has been featured in a variety of online and print based publications. He has long brown hair and drives and maintains a small fleet of Volvo station wagons.

Ross Nugent

Still from Tear It Up, Son!

Ross Nugent

 

Christopher Smalley

Christopher Smalley

 

Christopher Smalley is an independent filmmaker who grew up in West Virginia, and has been living and working in the Pittsburgh area since 2002.  Since then he has consistently been creating film and video work, both experimental and narrative.

Matthew R. Day

Still from Mantis

Amtthew Day

 

Matthew R. Day is a Pittsburgh based filmmaker.  He is the host and curator of the monthly film screening series The Pittsburgh Film Kitchen and proprietor of the production company Matthew R. Day Media Productions LLC.

 

Meagan Koleck

Meagan Koleck utilizes digital media and virtual platforms as accessible tools for self-exploration, human connection, and sabotaging relationships that would otherwise persevere. Koleck critiques American culture’s societal expectations while celebrating otherness.